Category Archives: social change

A busy few weeks (OR to NYC to OR to SD and back)

It’s been a bit crazy lately. A week in New York with a group of 50 or so of the best and brightest from the UofO School of Journalism. Ad agency visits, sight seeing, portfolio stuff, great food(kimchi and blue cheese pocket from Momofuku Milk Bar? Amazing!), and lots of absorbing Manhattan.

Back to Eugene for two days of work, then a trip down to San Diego for a week. Busy, but just enough time to relax a bit and process the week in NYC.

La Jolla on flickr

So insights gleaned? I love visiting NYC, but I’d have to have a really compelling reason to end up there permanently. The advertising industry is shifting quickly in terms of channels and media possibilities, but there’s still a metric crapton of garbage being pushed through those channels. Don’t get me wrong – I think advertising today is brilliant and there are some pieces and people doing incredible work – but those pieces and people are few and far between in a sea of monotonous garbage. Times are changing, but many of the archaic problems still exist. ¬†Which just continues to make me want to help those people who can actually perpetuate positive change in the industry. And maybe that’s my biggest takeaway from the last few weeks – there’s tremendous opportunity to fix the problems of the world. The advertising world and the greater world as a whole.

Civilization is going downhill fast

Stumbled across this a while back, and kept forgetting to post it up. Pretty much speaks for itself.

via

Gulf Coast Relief Tee: Threadless “PeliCAN”

So it’s been a while since my last post. much longer than it should have been… life has been crazy (which I’m sure I can explain sometime…) but not just for me. In case you haven’t heard, it’s been a bit crazy in the Gulf of Mexico lately too. To lend a helping hand, t-shirt site Threadless.com has reached out to artist members Frederik Wepener and Ross Zietmaz to create this pretty impressive shirt, with 100% proceeds going to the fifteen-year-old Gulf Restoration Network. It’s intended to give a glimmer of hope to the situation in the Gulf, no matter how bleak it may seem. It’s a true collaboration concept to help the Gulf. The printing (water-based inks, of course) of the tee was donated by Threadless’ local friends Sharprint, and both designers have donated their standard designer payment to the cause as well. Pretty cool.

peliCAN - Threadless, Best T-shirts Ever

Click on the image above (or Click here) to check it out over at Threadless.

And for more Gulf Restoration Network stuff, check out Healthygulf.org.

Trash the beach party?

hmm. I get it. but I don’t get it. Over the top? Effective conveyance of the message? I really don’t know… all I know is somethin’ about it is just a bit unsettling. Maybe that’s the point?

Done for the Keep California Beautiful capaign by BBDO West. Great info on the campaign over at Osocio.

The Changing Face of Everyday Design

guardiaprogression

I just stumbled across this piece from The Guardian showing what they call “The Changing Face of Everyday Design.” Pretty simple, but pretty effective and interesting. If you click through, you can view all of the images at a larger scale. Somewhat ironically, they printed a few corrections noting that several of the police cars pictured were from the incorrect era. It shouldn’t be that difficult… and The Guardian is usually on top of stuff. I guess it just goes to show that some design is ahead (or behind, as the case may be) of its time.

Visual Information Overload: GOOD Magazine on Flickr

goodflickr

It looks like this has been around for a while, but somehow I’ve missed it until now. GOOD magazine has uploaded all of their Transparencies into a set on Flickr… pretty impressive collection of mind-blowing info-graphics. Kind of a shame they restrict the flickr images to small size, forcing you to click through to the GOOD website. But I’ve seen worse. Plus, their infographics are so amazing, I’ll let it slide.

Maybe green really is the new black?

I’m apprehensively fascinated by the recent increase in quality creative for green topics; whether Greenpeace, the EPA, the NRDC, or a clothing company, the quality of creative and the directness of the “green” messages is impressive. I stumbled across this spot via Osocio today.

While it’s not completely polished, the ideas and the execution are both there to tackle an issue that was once relegated to public service announcements. And while a quick visit to the BlueAvacado website reveals it’s a fairly simple marketing message to increase sales of their reusable shopping bags, I’m okay with it because the messages of social change are being presented in a more apparent and more creative fahion. And they’re actually doing some pretty positive public work as well. Interesting to watch the evolution.