Category Archives: art

“Hands” tries to give Honda a hand

Hondas sales figures have’t been so good lately, and coincidentally, the Honda I was driving finally had enough and gave up. But this impressive showing from Weiden + Kennedy London proves that unlike my car, Honda still has some breath. Beautifully creative with strong reference stylistically to the classic honda spots like Cog.

Nice to see Honda still fighting.

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National Geographic Found unearths the beauty of the past

National Geographic Found

I just stumbled across this incredible site from National Geographic in celebration of their 125th year. It showcases photos from the archives (some never before published) as curated by National Geographic’s William Bonner.

There are some stunning photos unearthed that pay homage to the importance of photojournalism and the power of a well-crafted image.

found-logo3

Also of particular interest to typophiles is the description on the About page regarding Ludwig Light, the typeface used in the “Found” logo, somewhat ironically ‘found’ by Nat Geo designer Roy Wilhelm. Worth a read as well.

What does Ewan McGregor know about The Bauhaus? Apparently enough to narrate a mini-series of six videos that give a brief history of some major design movements, out out by The Open University.

You can view all six videos from Gothic Revival to Postmodernism on youtube by clicking here. The videos are concise, the animation clean. They distill concepts a bit heavily and leave out significant elements (like distilling Modernism to a quote from Mies van der Rohe?) but for about two minutes of learning, it’s pretty excellent. All six segments are definitely worth the time to watch. Very cool stuff.

[via Co.Design]

The naming of products is a difficult matter. Or is it? Just look at the typefaces!

 

There is a time and a place for every typeface. Yes, even Comic Sans. But that doesn’t mean that there aren’t typefaces that I despise with a passion. For many, it’s Comic Sans.  So much so, that there are entire websites like Ban Comic Sans dedicated to it’s atrocities. I don’t personally mind Comic Sans that much. My ‘Comic Sans’, if you will, is the typeface Giddy Up. Something about the fake cowboy motif and the stars just kind of irks me. I realize there’s a time and a place where it works as display type, but I hope I’m never around for that time or that place. Which led me to be completely floored when I came across this:

Giddy Up & Go Granola Packaging

Giddy Up & Go close-up

The Giddy Up & Go granola from Thoughtful Foods was pretty good. But I can’t figure out what happened with the name! How does a product end up with the same name as the prominent typeface that’s used on it’s packaging?!? There are two possible scenarios that I was able to come up with:

Scenario #1:

“Our product is called Giddy Up & Go granola. What typeface should we use for our packaging?”

“Oh hey! Look! There’s an awesome typeface that has the same name as our Granola!”

“We should use that! And be sure to put a drop shadow on it too!”

or

Scenario #2: We have this product, but we can’t figure out what to call it. We have these typefaces that we like for the packaging.

“Ooh! I like that swirly typeface… what’s it called?”

“It’s called Giddy Up.”

“That’s a great name! Lets call it “Giddy Up Granola!” and give it a drop shadow!”

I’m flabbergasted and dumbfounded. How does this happen? And why did it need that drop shadow on top of it all? The food might be ‘Thoughtful” but I’m not convinced the design is.

The Uncluded: blending musical genres in the best ways with genius lyrics

What happens when legendary and groundbreaking hip-hop artist/producer Aesop Rock teams up with grammy winning, critically acclaimed singer songwriter Kimya Dawson? This:

Lyrics that are genius, beautiful, heart wrenching and smart. Melodies and beats that are dynamic and vibrant. The blending of genres, styles, and talents. This is music at its best. Self expression, coping, therapy, exploration, fear, adversity, and other fairly weighty subject matter. But it’s handled with a beautiful craft and a touch of humor that keeps it beautifully approachable.

The Current now has the entire album, Hokey Fright, available to stream now pre-release! The album releases on May 7th from Rhymesayers Entertainment.

 

Food, cityscapes, and photography: three things that don’t usually go together so well

I’m a fan of food. Not just eating it, but making it, crafting it, and yes, even photographing it. Which is why I find this so awesome:

Swedish art director Peter Johansson teamed up with Swedish food lab Atelier Food to create this amazing foodscape that comes shockingly close to resembling a city.

From Johansson’s website:

The Atelier Food still life is built on a grid. The still life
represents the work of Atelier Food and the connection between food and
society. It links the playfulness and creativity within the project with
the ambitious goals and long-term challenges. In the spirit of the
whole Atelier Food project it is also a creative co-operation between a
chef, one Art Director and one Photographer.

Photography by Henrik Petersson. More photos at Johansson’s website. Now I’m hungry.

[via Its Nice That]

Analog in a digital world? or How to get the full TSA pat down

For those who aren’t aware, I got a BFA in Photography what seems like eons ago… which means that I actually shot a good deal of photography on film. That clear stuff that had images on ’em, before digital photos. Remember that? yeah… probably not. I barely do.

As my previous post mentioned, it was Worldwide Pinhole Day, and even though one can put a pinhole lens on a digital camera, it just seemed wrong… kind of like watching a Milli Vanilli music video in Dolby 5.1… just not quite appropriate for the situation. So I resolved to bust out a film camera to appropriately capture the decisive moment. However, I was traveling that weekend, and had to travel via air. And apparently, asking to have your high-speed film hand-checked to avoild x-ray machine fogging, is an automatic ticket to a full TSA pat down, complete with swabbing inside the waistline of the jeans. I didn’t realize film was that offensive.

And what’s more surprising – or rather, disappointing – is that it’s near impossible to find a good place who will just develop a roll of film. Most drugstores either charge an arm and a leg or require you to buy a full set of prints – which I wasn’t really needing. I ended up begrudgingly heading to Wally World, where they promptly developed my film, complete with gobs of residual crap gummed up on the negatives, and about 50% of them with scratches.
So in summary, I wanted to remain true to traditional photography and shoot film – which left me with a rather uncomfortable TSA patdown and an expensively developed roll of negatives that may or may not be salvageable. Milli Vanilli in Dolby Surround isn’t sounding all that bad right now.