Category Archives: food

The naming of products is a difficult matter. Or is it? Just look at the typefaces!

 

There is a time and a place for every typeface. Yes, even Comic Sans. But that doesn’t mean that there aren’t typefaces that I despise with a passion. For many, it’s Comic Sans.  So much so, that there are entire websites like Ban Comic Sans dedicated to it’s atrocities. I don’t personally mind Comic Sans that much. My ‘Comic Sans’, if you will, is the typeface Giddy Up. Something about the fake cowboy motif and the stars just kind of irks me. I realize there’s a time and a place where it works as display type, but I hope I’m never around for that time or that place. Which led me to be completely floored when I came across this:

Giddy Up & Go Granola Packaging

Giddy Up & Go close-up

The Giddy Up & Go granola from Thoughtful Foods was pretty good. But I can’t figure out what happened with the name! How does a product end up with the same name as the prominent typeface that’s used on it’s packaging?!? There are two possible scenarios that I was able to come up with:

Scenario #1:

“Our product is called Giddy Up & Go granola. What typeface should we use for our packaging?”

“Oh hey! Look! There’s an awesome typeface that has the same name as our Granola!”

“We should use that! And be sure to put a drop shadow on it too!”

or

Scenario #2: We have this product, but we can’t figure out what to call it. We have these typefaces that we like for the packaging.

“Ooh! I like that swirly typeface… what’s it called?”

“It’s called Giddy Up.”

“That’s a great name! Lets call it “Giddy Up Granola!” and give it a drop shadow!”

I’m flabbergasted and dumbfounded. How does this happen? And why did it need that drop shadow on top of it all? The food might be ‘Thoughtful” but I’m not convinced the design is.

Food, cityscapes, and photography: three things that don’t usually go together so well

I’m a fan of food. Not just eating it, but making it, crafting it, and yes, even photographing it. Which is why I find this so awesome:

Swedish art director Peter Johansson teamed up with Swedish food lab Atelier Food to create this amazing foodscape that comes shockingly close to resembling a city.

From Johansson’s website:

The Atelier Food still life is built on a grid. The still life
represents the work of Atelier Food and the connection between food and
society. It links the playfulness and creativity within the project with
the ambitious goals and long-term challenges. In the spirit of the
whole Atelier Food project it is also a creative co-operation between a
chef, one Art Director and one Photographer.

Photography by Henrik Petersson. More photos at Johansson’s website. Now I’m hungry.

[via Its Nice That]

Why does Australia have the craziest beer commercials?

So as some of you know, I had a short internship doing work for AB, i.e. Anheuser Busch… aka, Bud. I worked on some pretty extreme, pretty intense beer commercials. but I’m not sure that any really came close to this gem:

wow. The Aussies always have some good beer spots. but this spot for Hahn SuperDry might take the cake.

And an insider (and beer geek’s) tip: when a brewing company spends more on advertising than making the beer, I usually pass.

That being said, I’d love a ferret that could hand-cap my brews.

Hey! Read this! (and why regular posting has been temporarily suspended)

Sometimes you have to be direct to get your message across. Like this beautiful bit of package design courtesy of the Hain Celestial Group:

Hey! Read my label!

Apparently organic foods and subtlety don’t go hand in hand. Although I suppose it is somewhat attention grabbing and effective, in an annoying sort of way. I’m fine with my rice crisps not having any attitude, thank you. Anyway…

Once again, I’m in the process of moving again, although just a few miles away this time – not half way across the country. So at the moment, I have no internet and no substantial time. Add to it the duties involved with showing a visiting friend around the area, and unfortunately the blog has fallen by the wayside. Dare I say it, I’m on a non-blogging staycation! (imagine regurgitation sounds here).

Anyway, a photo for all you photo lovers from my recent trip to White Sands National Monument.

clouds at white sands

Most likely, assuming all goes according to a loose plan, semi-regular posting should theoretically resume in a few days.

The naming of products is a difficult matter

The naming of products is a difficult matter… or so it seems. It’s just a prototype at the moment, but product design specifications aside, this might be one of the worst product names I’ve seen in a while.

Heinz Snap Pots Beanzawave world's smallest microwave

yep. I would have loved to be part of the discussion where they decided that “Beanzawave” was the name they would plaster across the world’s smallest microwave. And that’s not even considering that the product is powered via USB and theoretically uses phone radio frequencies to heat mini cups of beans for those who can’t bare to leave their desk for even a moment. Apparently the Microwave Association doesn’t think too highly of the product at the moment… I’ll be curious to see if this one ever hits store shelves.

And hopefully, it will have a better name than Beanzawave.

Upgrade Yourself: Be A Better Man in 30 Days?

I’m not usually a huge fan of overtly manly guides to anything, thus I was leery about Gear Patrol’s upcoming “Be A Better Man in 30 Days.” But Gear Patrol, a blog that defines itself as “The Definitive Resource for the Ever-Evolving Man” and typically is a blend of luxury, style, sports, and technology may be on to something with this series.

30-days-of-upgrades

Yesterday’s feature was tie and shirt pairings, today’s post was a brief rundown on “properly ordering a steak.” Simple, well done, and an interesting blend of style, commentary, and just enough machismo to give it character without coming off as a bit contrived. If you’re bored, it just might be worth watching (which is more than I can say for most stuff out there).